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Do More Work

Initiate growth by jamming more reps into fewer minutes in the gym.
By Team Iron Man
 
PQ: This program takes advantage of the body’s overriding mandate: Adapt or die. When you put stress on a muscle, millions of years or evolutionary biology will force it to change so it can better handle that stress.
If your growth is stalled out and you’re at that frustrating point where you think something’s wrong with you, it’s time to try escalating density training. EDT is a system that’s specifically designed to put size on stubborn muscle groups by subjecting them to a novel form of stress. This program takes advantage of the body’s overriding mandate: Adapt or die. When you put stress on a muscle, millions of years or evolutionary biology will force it to change so it can better handle that stress. That’s why lifting weights makes your muscles grow.
Your muscles don’t know to get bigger. They only know whether they’re under stress or not—and if they’re repeatedly subjected to mechanical resistance, and being broken down, they’ll adapt in order to not break down so readily. Getting bigger and stronger are simply side effects of this adaptation, and building muscle size is dependent on the volume and intensity of the stress that your muscles are capable of handling.
By subjecting your muscles to as many reps and as intense a pump as they can tolerate, EDT will introduce your muscles to a new kind of stress. With adequate recovery, they’ll adapt and grow at an increased rate.
The main reason for the change will be the fact that you’re performing greater overall reps and volume. EDT subjects your muscle to increased overall stimulus through mechanical tension. The greater the stimulus, the greater the necessary adaptation. You’ll damage fibers during training, then repair them afterward, causing them

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The Mechanical Advantage: Part 2

How to build a bigger lower body with only one set.
By Vince Del Monte
 
PQ: “When you do too much volume, you have a big disparity between protein synthesis and protein breakdown. The more volume you use, the more you break down protein.”
I know what you’re thinking: “There is no way you can build bigger legs with just one set.” And that’s exactly what I thought myself. But for the past eight weeks I’ve been employing a very specific technique that has made my legs bigger and stronger with just one all-out set per workout per bodypart.
The technique is called “mechanical advantage drop sets” or MADS. Before diving into MADS, let’s give this subject matter some context so that you don’t think this is some sensational clickbait type of article. For everything to make sense we must discuss this one issue:
In my opinion, the number-one mistake that natural lifters make is doing too much volume. The key is to trigger muscle protein synthesis and then stop training. When done properly, this can sometimes be done in as little as one to two sets per bodypart. I know that sounds crazy, but it’s exactly what I’ve been doing in my latest training cycle with amazing results. I’ve been hitting every bodypart three times per week with only one to two sets per bodypart and a lot of you have noticed some decent changes in my body if you follow me on Instagram (@vincedelmonte).
When you do too much volume, you have a big disparity between protein synthesis and protein breakdown. The more volume you use, the more you break down protein.
This means you must avoid drug-enhanced programs that work for your favorite bodybuilder and action movie star (who’s also on tons of drugs). In short, I hate to say this, but if you

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On The Flipside

How to building your glutes and hamstrings like a man
By Vince Del Monte
 
The gluteus maximus is one of the most powerful muscles in the human body. The gluteus maximus is a powerful extender of the hip joint as well as an external rotator and adductor. Because of its size and superficial location compared to the other glute muscles, it is often the major focus when it comes to training the backside of your body.
The hamstrings are a group of four tendon-like muscles that are found in the posterior thigh. All four of the hamstring muscles cross behind the knee into their respective insertions and therefore act to flex the knee. All but the short head of the biceps femoris cross the hip and aid in extension as well as externally rotate and adduct while in neutral position.
Since both the hamstrings and gluteus maximus muscles cross the hip, they will be the major contributors to hip extension. The anatomy and function of the hamstring muscles are altered significantly by both knee position and hip position. Understanding the anatomical relationships between these muscles will go a long way in not only performing glute/ham exercises correctly but also selecting the appropriate ones.
ACTIVE RANGE OF MOTION
It should be noted that checking how far your joints can move actively will be critical to reducing the risk of spinal and knee injury and long-term wear. Controlling the eccentric portion of hip extension and pressing exercises so as not to go beyond what your hips can flex concentrically will not only reduce injury risk but enhance muscle contraction. The same can be said for knee flexion exercises where machines can shove the knee and hips in compromised positions. “Full range of motion” should only mean active motion. Going lower and lower in deadlifts, leg presses, squats, and

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