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Intensity Audit

Do you go hard enough in the weight room? Most of us think we do, but it’s not always the case. A recent study published in The Journal Of Strength And Conditioning Research described two groups of trained subjects who participated in three separate workouts. The first was 10 reps of a leg press, bench press, leg extension, and arm curl. The next workout was a one-rep max of those four exercises, and the third was 10-rep max of the same movements.
One group worked out by themselves, and the other group was under the supervision of a personal trainer. The group under the auspices of a trainer chose significantly heavier loads in all of the lifts. The largest difference was in the lower-body exercises. Interestingly, even the group who had the trainer chose weight that was quite a bit lighter than their 10-rep max indicated.

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Hitting Below The Belt

The Journal Of Strength And Conditioning Research recently published research indicating that specific training programs focused on lower-body muscle hypertrophy and upper-body maximal strength can result in greater strength and power gains in the upper body. For six weeks, a group of resistance-trained young men were instructed to perform either a high-weight low-rep program for both upper and lower body (four to five reps at 88 to 90 percent of their maximum effort), or a high-weight low-rep program for just the upper body and a more hypertrophy-focused workout for the lower body (10 to 12 reps at 65 to 70 percent of max effort).
At the end of the experiment, the group who used the high-rep range for their legs saw greater increases in strength and power gains in the upper body and lost more body fat than the group who did low reps for their whole body.

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Do More Work

Initiate growth by jamming more reps into fewer minutes in the gym.
By Team Iron Man
 
PQ: This program takes advantage of the body’s overriding mandate: Adapt or die. When you put stress on a muscle, millions of years or evolutionary biology will force it to change so it can better handle that stress.
If your growth is stalled out and you’re at that frustrating point where you think something’s wrong with you, it’s time to try escalating density training. EDT is a system that’s specifically designed to put size on stubborn muscle groups by subjecting them to a novel form of stress. This program takes advantage of the body’s overriding mandate: Adapt or die. When you put stress on a muscle, millions of years or evolutionary biology will force it to change so it can better handle that stress. That’s why lifting weights makes your muscles grow.
Your muscles don’t know to get bigger. They only know whether they’re under stress or not—and if they’re repeatedly subjected to mechanical resistance, and being broken down, they’ll adapt in order to not break down so readily. Getting bigger and stronger are simply side effects of this adaptation, and building muscle size is dependent on the volume and intensity of the stress that your muscles are capable of handling.
By subjecting your muscles to as many reps and as intense a pump as they can tolerate, EDT will introduce your muscles to a new kind of stress. With adequate recovery, they’ll adapt and grow at an increased rate.
The main reason for the change will be the fact that you’re performing greater overall reps and volume. EDT subjects your muscle to increased overall stimulus through mechanical tension. The greater the stimulus, the greater the necessary adaptation. You’ll damage fibers during training, then repair them afterward, causing them

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Protein Trends

The latest anabolic innovations to your favorite supplement.
By Adam M. Gonzalez, PhD, CSCS, CISSN
 
Protein powder continues to be one of the most effective and well-established supplements for building muscle, burning fat, and improving overall health. Consumer demand and painstaking research has lead to several innovations in the last few years. Some modest tweaks simply reflect the attitude of the buyer and a desire for convenience, while other developments represent years of scientific discovery and hard-earned lessons from the trenches. Together, these new innovations in the protein-powder market are a good indicator of the future of sports supplements.
Native Whey Proteins
All proteins start as long strands of amino acids constructed into highly specific three-dimensional shapes. A protein in its native state has a properly folded structure and the protein integrity is fully conserved. This is in contrast to the denatured state, in which the structure is disrupted and the strands of amino acids begin to unravel. Most whey protein powders undergo two processes of filtration and pasteurization. Native whey protein eliminates the second filtration process in effort to provide the pure native proteins from milk.
Several high-quality whey protein supplements are now manufactured as primary products of milk rather than as a by-product of cheese manufacturing. Native whey protein comes from milk rather than cheese. The filtration process can affect protein structure by altering the molecular interactions in the native proteins, which could potentially alter the digestibility of the protein. All whey protein sold in the United States needs to first be pasteurized, which means the whey protein will be exposed to a level of heat that may cause changes in some of the proteins. However, native whey only goes through one high-heat pasteurization process (other types of protein are pasteurized twice). All of the remaining processing steps to native whey proteins are

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Plan B

The perfect workout for a quick biceps pump
By Redmann Wright
 
For those days when time isn’t on your side, you can always hit arms. Sure, 15 or 20 minutes in the gym might feel worthless if you’re used to 90-minute workouts, but look at it this way: You already know that if you skip a workout, it’s going to bother you all day and maybe into tomorrow. That’s why we have this Plan B biceps blaster.
A quick pump will help you feel like you put in work today, which leaves you satisfied, de-stressed, and ready to tackle the next task, but it also offers some legitimate hypertrophy benefits. Evidence recently presented at the International Symposium on Strength Training in Madrid showed that more than 20 weekly sets per muscle group per week resulted in almost double the average growth compared to less than five weekly sets. While more may be better, there is clearly a sweet spot that can be reached in a 15- or 20-minute window.
This workout also gives your body a change. As we know, shocking the muscles every once in a while is the prescription to induce growth. These three exercises are slightly off the beaten path. They are also bilateral, meaning they will take less time than an exercise such as a concentration curl. This combination of unfamiliar exercises, short rest periods, and bilateral motion adds up to a workout that is fast and efficient.
With this in mind, here is our quick Plan B biceps workout for when life gets in the way. It is just enough to get that great pump you want and make it to that next meeting, appointment, or deadline. IM
Dave Draper-Style Forehead Curl
You’ll begin this exercise like a typical curl, with the weight starting from waist level. Stand with your feet

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