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Category Archives : Nutrition Science

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The Morning-Person Diet

Early birds eat healthier worms, says new research from the journal Obesity. A group of scientists recently examined the habits of 2,000 people to determine if their sleeping and waking proclivities affected their diet. Clear differences in both calorie and macronutrient intake were evident. Morning people made healthier choices throughout the day. Night owls ate more sugar and less protein in the morning.
At night, they ate more sugar and fat than morning people. Weekends were the worst. Evening people had more irregular meal times and indulged in twice as many feedings on weekends. They also slept worse and were less physically active overall. If you are able to transition into a morning person, it seems that your health, physique, and state of mine will appreciate it.

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Train Hard, Stay Healthy

Methylsulfonylmethane, better known as MSM, has long been used by athletes for its ability to promote joint health. A new study, published in the Journal Of Sports Medicine, shows that supplementing with MSM can quench post-workout inflammation that might otherwise keep you out of the gym. In the study, trained subjects were given three grams of OptiMSM, a patented form of MSM, for four weeks. They then performed 100 eccentric knee extensions in order to get a massive inflammation response.
After testing the blood for markers of inflammation, scientists found that the group who supplemented with OptiMSM had a significantly dampened inflammation response compared to the group who took a placebo. The authors of the study suggest that this indicates a reduction in post-training suppression of the immune system that comes with intense training, leaving the user less likely to get sick and with more cellular resources to train hard on consecutive day.

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Protein And Probiotics

Forget chicken and rice or coconut oil and coffee, the latest fitness nutrition pairing seems to be protein and probiotics. Researchers from the University of Tampa in Florida put 29 young trained men through a brutal lower-body workout on two separate occasions. For two weeks before one workout, the men took 20 grams of casein. Before the other workout, they took the casein supplement and one billion colony forming units of the probiotic bacteria Bacillus coagulans.
When the subjects included the probiotics they reported less muscle soreness and were able to generate more power after the workout. The probiotics also blunted levels of creatine kinase in the blood, which suggests that the bacteria reduced muscle breakdown. Previous research of Bacillus coagulans showed that it also improves immune response and digestion.

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Don’t Fear P.M. Protein

Slamming a casein protein shake before bed is an old bodybuilding strategy when you’re trying to add muscle. New evidence suggests it won’t hurt you when you’re trying to lean out either. In a study published in the journal Nutrients, two groups of overweight subjects consumed a beverage 30 minutes before bed. One group consumed a zero-calorie drink while the other had 30 grams of casein protein.
Scientists measured the glucose concentration in the fat cells and verified that the casein did not blunt overnight lipolysis (breakdown of fats) compared to the zero-calorie group. Since muscle preservation is a big part of optimizing metabolic rate, that 30 grams of nightly casein might be helping you burn more fat, especially if you’re on a calorie-restricted diet.

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Ditch The Diet Drinks

A strategic use of a diet soda to get you through a sugar craving may keep your diet on-track, but a new research review indicates that diet sodas don’t actually help you lose weight. A collaborative project headed by researchers at the Imperial College London’s School of Public Health found that consuming diet drinks might cause people to eat more calories by stimulating their sweet-sensitive taste buds. (They also found that much of the research showing a link between diet sodas and weight loss was financed by food and beverage companies.)
Many nutrition experts disagree with this finding and believe that zero-calorie beverages can help people manage calorie intake. The bottom line seems to be that they are better than a full-sugar soda, but the smartest plan is to wean yourself off that sugary taste.

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