FREE REPORT DOWNLOAD - Death of Bulking - CLICK HERE

Hide
Show

Category Archives : Proteins

Featured

Don’t Fear P.M. Protein

Slamming a casein protein shake before bed is an old bodybuilding strategy when you’re trying to add muscle. New evidence suggests it won’t hurt you when you’re trying to lean out either. In a study published in the journal Nutrients, two groups of overweight subjects consumed a beverage 30 minutes before bed. One group consumed a zero-calorie drink while the other had 30 grams of casein protein.
Scientists measured the glucose concentration in the fat cells and verified that the casein did not blunt overnight lipolysis (breakdown of fats) compared to the zero-calorie group. Since muscle preservation is a big part of optimizing metabolic rate, that 30 grams of nightly casein might be helping you burn more fat, especially if you’re on a calorie-restricted diet.

Continue Reading

Size Rules

Ironclad laws you need to learn if you want to add serious muscle
By Jay Ashman
 
PQ: “Progressive overload is the number-one rule for gaining strength and size. As you increase workload, you will increase muscle.”
 
Since man began lifting weights, we have sought to gain muscular size and strength. That pursuit is a huge reason why you read this magazine and step foot into the gym. In the 1940s there was a popular comic-book advertisement from Charles Atlas that promised skinny kids the secrets to gaining size and confidence, and all you had to do was send back the little cutout piece of paper with your address for his free book. I never read that book. I was born in 1974, so I can’t vouch for its contents, but I have studied the iron game, and lifted long enough, to understand that the universal truths I’m about to write down for you will apply now and through the next several hundred years.
 
FOOD
The first set of rules pertains to food and how to eat to gain size. The commonly asked question is usually about protein intake. Ideally you want to eat approximately one gram of protein per pound of lean body mass (LBM). I don’t mean your bodyweight, I mean fat-free mass. If you’re 250 pounds with 25 percent body fat, then you’ll eat about 188 grams of protein per day. Protein can be increased up to 1.5 grams per pound if you wish, but that just takes away from other macronutrients that have a critical role in building muscle. Start with one gram per pound of LBM and adjust from there.
To find your carbohydrate intake, you just double your lean mass. If you have 188 pounds of lean mass, this means you’ll be eating 376 grams of carbohydrates a day. Finalize

Continue Reading

No Protein? No Problem

There’s a reason no one cycles protein the way they do carbs: Because protein is awesome and you always want get plenty of it. If there are days you cannot get enough protein—you’re fasting, traveling, you’re vegan, or maybe you have a short-term medical condition—a new study shows that a daily hit of L-citrulline can help you hold onto your muscle.
A study published in the journal Clinical Nutrition took eight subjects and put them on a low-protein diet for three days. On the fourth day they were given a dose of L-citruline and experienced an increase in the synthesis of new muscle protein. This action had no effect on insulin levels.
More research is needed to determine the mechanism of action and L-citrulline’s effect on muscle breakdown, but for now it looks like a promising solution if you ever have to cut back on your daily protein.

Continue Reading

Drink Your Greens

A health-based supplement is gaining popularity among serious fitness enthusiasts.
By Jenevieve Roper, PhD, CSCS, CISSN
Okay, let’s be honest: How many of you actually get the recommended dietary intake of vegetables each day? I mean, your focus is strictly on gains, which requires a lot of protein and moderate amounts of carbs and fat. Sometimes an overbearing focus on protein can end up harming you in the long run. Well, I’m happy to report that many of you are wising up to this fact and figuring out other means of getting in those key nutrients that you only get from a variety of fruits and vegetables. One method that is gaining popularity is utilizing a green powder.
So what exactly are green powders? They are exactly what they sound like. Manufacturers freeze-dry chlorella, spirulina, barley, kale, alfalfa, wheatgrass, spinach, broccoli, and other green-hued vegetables and herbs, and process them into a concentrated, albeit low-calorie, powder. But it doesn’t just end there. They’re actually one of the fastest-growing category of supplements, and it’s likely because they deliver a day’s worth of fruits and veggies in a scoop of powder without the additional calories. A green powder is fast, convenient, and not nearly as terrible tasting as you’d think. It’s are also a great supplement if you’re on a strict diet but still want your nutrients.
Nutritional Support
Well, something with the name “green powder” should provide some nutritional support, because they aren’t selling sex appeal. Green powders are full of great nutrients and phytochemicals that provide some great nutritional support. Well, it starts with their ingredients. Many green powders vary a bit in their ingredients, but there are some key ones that you should look for so you get the most bang for your buck:
Wheatgrass: If the superfoods were the Justice League, wheat grass is

Continue Reading