FREE REPORT DOWNLOAD - Death of Bulking - CLICK HERE

Hide
Show

Category Archives : Shoulders

Featured

Falling For Traps

Shoulder pain is a common companion if you’ve been lifting for years. A recent study published in The Journal of Strength And Conditioning Research has found one way to reduce painful shoulder joints: Hit your lower traps more. In the experiment, a large group of trained men were assessed with shoulder impingement syndrome, a common cause of shoulder pain. (One common reason for shoulder impingement syndrome is an over-reliance on certain big lifts such as the bench press.)
Scientists found that a main factor in shoulder impingement syndrome is the presence of weak lower traps. The best exercises to hit your lower traps are one-arm rows, face pulls, and the prone trap raise, which is similar to a one-arm incline Y-raise, using a very light weight. If you love chest day, you need to start regularly incorporating these moves.

Continue Reading

Test Your Chest

If you’re looking for the rush you get from an amazing pump in your pecs, try this workout now.
By Redmann Wright
 
At different periods in our training, we all hit plateaus. It’s a fact of training life. With that in mind, we should all be looking for that something new, that boom that says “hi” to your muscles. Here is that workout you’ve been looking for to really dial in some highly focused stimulation to the muscle fibers in your pecs. This short but intense program is designed to spark an incredible pump while initiating gains in new muscle. Who doesn’t want that?
The idea is to progressively move up in weight on each set of the bench press, cable crossovers, and lying low-pulley chest flyes. This gradual increase in load will give the body a chance for adaption. For these three exercises, focus on slow reps, maximizing the time under tension on the negative position of the movement. Also don’t forget the lost art of peak contraction. Be sure to intensely squeeze your pecs at the top of each rep.
The bodyweight bounce push-ups are a different beast than the bench press and cable exercises. They will fill your pecs with so much blood and test your muscular endurance at the same time, you’ll barely be able to get your hands together for the flyes. Performed for high reps, they are a great addition to the loaded exercises that are done in the eight- to 10-rep range.
I call this “Hypertrophy-Specific Training.” It’s the ideal method to increase muscle mass and push through the winter into the summer months (aka “shirts-off season”) that are fast approaching.
 
Barbell Bench Press
 
Barbell Bench Press
Lie faceup squarely on a bench with your feet flat on the floor. Grasp the barbell with a wide overhand grip, well outside

Continue Reading

Legend Training

An industry veteran pays homage to an IFBB Hall of Famer with this timeless shoulder workout.
By Tony Estrada
 
In January of 2002, an elderly giant walked into Club Fit Pembroke Pines in south Florida and turned nearly every head in the facility. He had a shoulder-length ponytail and the complexion of Ovaltine. I was working as the fitness manager, and he told me he recently celebrated his 60th birthday. After having been a professional bodybuilder back in the day, he was ready to fulfill another dream: becoming a personal trainer. I asked him to come do a workout with me as an informal interview.
It turns out, I was in the presence of greatness. Harold Poole is a member of the IFBB Hall of Fame and still holds the record for being the youngest athlete to compete in a Mr. Olympia. He won Mr. Universe when he was 19 years old and became the first African-American to be crowned Mr. America. (Harold was half African-American and half German—a combination he credited for his great genetics.) In 1965, at the age of 21, he competed in the very first Mr. Olympia. Harold was the only bodybuilder to compete in the first three Mr. Os, placing second all three times. He lost twice to Larry Scott, and then to the legendary Sergio Oliva. He’s still considered to be the best teenage bodybuilder of all time.
In his prime, Harold had the kind of physique that has come back in style today. If a 22-year-old Harold Poole entered a Classic Physique competition in 2017, nobody could touch him.
During our introductory workout, it was obvious Harold knew his stuff. We traded ideas and switched back and forth on who called the next exercise. He loved the Olympic military press while I added the dumbbells. It was

Continue Reading

Do More Work

Initiate growth by jamming more reps into fewer minutes in the gym.
By Team Iron Man
 
PQ: This program takes advantage of the body’s overriding mandate: Adapt or die. When you put stress on a muscle, millions of years or evolutionary biology will force it to change so it can better handle that stress.
If your growth is stalled out and you’re at that frustrating point where you think something’s wrong with you, it’s time to try escalating density training. EDT is a system that’s specifically designed to put size on stubborn muscle groups by subjecting them to a novel form of stress. This program takes advantage of the body’s overriding mandate: Adapt or die. When you put stress on a muscle, millions of years or evolutionary biology will force it to change so it can better handle that stress. That’s why lifting weights makes your muscles grow.
Your muscles don’t know to get bigger. They only know whether they’re under stress or not—and if they’re repeatedly subjected to mechanical resistance, and being broken down, they’ll adapt in order to not break down so readily. Getting bigger and stronger are simply side effects of this adaptation, and building muscle size is dependent on the volume and intensity of the stress that your muscles are capable of handling.
By subjecting your muscles to as many reps and as intense a pump as they can tolerate, EDT will introduce your muscles to a new kind of stress. With adequate recovery, they’ll adapt and grow at an increased rate.
The main reason for the change will be the fact that you’re performing greater overall reps and volume. EDT subjects your muscle to increased overall stimulus through mechanical tension. The greater the stimulus, the greater the necessary adaptation. You’ll damage fibers during training, then repair them afterward, causing them

Continue Reading

The Mechanical Advantage

This relatively painful intensity technique can lead to rapid gains in size.
By Vince Del Monte
This month I want to talk about a technique I’m currently employing inside my eight-week training cycle that has me doing—wait for it—just one all-out set per workout, per bodypart.
The technique is called “mechanical advantage drop sets” or MADS (which is a great acronym I thought I invented until I did a quick Google search). Before diving into MADS, let’s define drop sets so we’re on the same page. A drop set is when you perform a given exercise to the point of concentric failure, and then change a variable in a way that allows you to extend the set into what I call “The Hurt Box.”
You are likely familiar with drop sets that include decreasing the weight once you hit fatigue so that you can chase some extra reps with a lighter load. This is a good technique in my opinion, but not a great technique. Drop sets are also known as “strip sets,” and it’s likely one of the first mass-gaining techniques you’ve experimented with during your early days of your muscle-building journey. However, as the years go on, the “gains train” starts to slow down and we start looking for more advanced methods to continue our quest for a bigger and stronger body.
That’s where MADS comes in, and in a moment I’ll give you my own MADS upper-body training program so you can put this bad boy to the test. The “mechanical” in MADS refers to a change in body position, which applies to increasing or decreasing leverage. For instance, you’ve likely noticed it’s easier to do a squat with your feet wider versus narrower. It’s easier to perform a bench press on a decline instead of incline. It’s easier to perform a

Continue Reading